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Financial Accounting Tools for Business Decision Making 9th Edition Test Bank By Kimmel

Instant download Financial Accounting Tools for Business Decision Making 9th Edition Test Bank By Kimmel. All Chapters are included in the full version with the correct answers and you are able to download this test bank fast and instantly.

CHAPTER 4

ACCRUAL ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS

CHAPTER LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Explain the accrual basis of accounting and the reasons for adjusting entries.  The revenue recognition principle dictates that companies recognize revenue when a performance obligation has been satisfied. The expense recognition principle dictates that companies recognize expenses in the period when the company makes efforts to generate those revenues.

Under the cash basis, companies record events only in the periods in which the company receives or pays cash. Accrual-based accounting means that companies record in the periods in which the events occur, events that change a company’s financial statements even if cash has not been exchanged.

Companies make adjusting entries at the end of an accounting period. These entries ensure that companies record revenues in the period in which the performance obligation is satisfied and that companies recognize expenses in the period in which they are incurred. The major types of adjusting entries are prepaid expenses, unearned revenues, accrued revenues, and accrued expenses.

  1. Prepare adjusting entries for deferrals.  Deferrals are either prepaid expenses or unearned revenues. Companies make adjusting entries for deferrals at the statement date to record the portion of the deferred item that represents the expense incurred or the revenue for services performed in the current accounting period.
  2. Prepare adjusting entries for accruals.  Accruals are either accrued revenues or accrued expenses. Adjusting entries for accruals record revenues earned and expenses incurred in the current accounting period that have not been recognized through daily entries.
  3. Prepare an adjusted trial balance and closing entries.  An adjusted trial balance is a trial balance that shows the balances of all accounts, including those that have been adjusted, at the end of an accounting period. The purpose of an adjusted trial balance is to show the effects of all financial events that have occurred during the accounting period.

One purpose of closing entries is to transfer net income or net loss for the period to Retained Earnings. A second purpose is to “zero-out” all temporary accounts (revenue accounts, expense accounts, and Dividends) so that they start each new period with a zero balance. To accomplish this, companies “close” all temporary accounts at the end of an accounting period. They make separate entries to close revenues and expenses to Income Summary, Income Summary to Retained Earnings, and Dividends to Retained Earnings. Only temporary accounts are closed.

The required steps in the accounting cycle are (1) analyze business transactions, (2) journalize the transactions, (3) post to ledger accounts, (4) prepare a trial balance, (5) journalize and post adjusting entries, (6) prepare an adjusted trial balance, (7) prepare financial statements, (8) journalize and post-closing entries, and (9) prepare a post-closing trial balance.

*5. Describe the purpose and the basic form of a worksheet.  The worksheet is a  device to make it easier to prepare adjusting entries and the financial statements. Companies often prepare a worksheet using a computer spreadsheet. The sets of columns of the worksheet are, from left to right, the unadjusted trial balance, adjustments, adjusted trial balance, income statement, and balance sheet.

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